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SCRIPT TITLE AND AUTHOR
Fugue for a Man and a Woman
by
A. S. Maulucci

GENRE
Drama

CHARACTERS
Married man and woman in their mid-thirties to early forties, no names

COMPLETE SCRIPT LENGTH
7 pages

INTEREST LEVEL
Adult

COPYRIGHT
REVISED EDITION COPYRIGHT 2001, ANTHONY S. MAULUCCI

 

About the author:  
ANTHONY S. MAULUCCI IS A POET, PLAYWRIGHT AND NOVELIST.  HIS RADIO DRAMA AND ADAPTATIONS OF MAJOR WORKS OF LITERATURE HAVE BEEN PRODUCED BY NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO AND THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION. HE IS THE AUTHOR OF TWO NOVELS, A COLLECTION OF SHORT STORIES AND A POETRY CHAPBOOK AVAILABLE FROM AMAZON.COM.  HIS WORK HAS APPEARED IN NUMEROUS JOURNALS AND MAGAZINES. 
Author Comments:

Fugue for a Man and a Woman Performance History

Three Rivers Community College, Norwich, Connecticut, with students Bill Wolcott and Allison Desrosiers, 1997.

The Readerís Feast Bookstore, Hartford, Connecticut, with Anthony Maulucci and

Jan Tormay, 1991.

Connecticut Public Radio, with David Keith and Frances McDormand of the Yale Drama School; musical score by Michael Leonhardt; directed by Faith Middleton, 1981.

Quebec One-act Play Festival, Montreal, Quebec, with Anthony Maulucci and

Elizabeth Mudry of the Montreal Theatre Lab, 1976.

For information regarding this script contact:
ANTHONY S. MAULUCCI
P.O. BOX 975
NORWICH, CT 06360  USA
 

Summary of Production Script

ON AN OTHERWISE ORDINARY NIGHT SOMEWHERE IN AMERICA, A MARRIED COUPLE OPEN THEIR HEARTS AND MINDS AND SPEAK WITH INNER VOICES ABOUT THEIR NEEDS AND FEARS IN AN HYPNOTIC FUGUE STATE.  IDEAS AND FEELINGS INTERWEAVE COUNTRAPUNTALLY AS IN A BAROQUE FUGUE BY BACH.  IRONICALY, THEY CANNOT HEAR EACH OTHER AND HAVE NO RECOLLECTION WHEN THEY RETURN TO NORMAL CONSCIOUSNESS.

Excerpt from Production Script

Fugue for a Man and a Woman

a play for voices and instruments by A. S. Maulucci

fugue n. 1: a polyphonic musical composition in which one or two themes are repeated or imitated by successively entering voices and contrapuntally developed in a continuous interweaving of the voice parts 2: a disturbed state of consciousness in which the one affected performs acts of which he appears to be conscious but of which on recovery he has no recollection.

-- Websterís Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary

Scene: a bare stage with a man and a woman seated on stools or simple chairs facing away from each other. Imagine them seated at opposite ends of a sofa or sitting up in bed together. The woman is reading a book. Occasionally, they look up at the audience as if appealing to a tribunal. Only at the end of the play do they turn to face one another.

 

Man: This is my sister -- wife -- a strong woman . . . dedicated to her own quest for truth . . . Sheís a woman who loves truth more than she loves me . . .

Woman: I love him . . . really . . .

Man: She says she loves me . . . Let that be enough . . .

Woman: He says he loves me, but itís not enough . . . A person has to love truth more than anything . . . A person must exist alone and apart, without reference to anyone, in order to be a pure, independent being with a well-defined identity . . . Once strong alone, a person can be stronger with love . . .

Man: I define myself by loving her . . . But do I love her for herself or for what I want from her? . . . I donít know . . . Sheís disappointed me so often . . . Iím not really sure IĎm capable of loving anyone . . . Then why go on? . . . Is a life without love worth living?

Woman: Iíve had to work so hard for love as Iíve had to work for everything else in my life . . . Nothing has been easy for me and everything has had its price . . . Has it all been worth it? . . . Perhaps . . . itís too soon to tell . . . I want to love and be loved absolutely, inconsolably, undyingly . . . I want to be swept away by passion . . . But I cannot force the issue with life . . .

Man: Life is more than an issue . . . or an unanswered question . . . or an unfulfilled quest

Woman: My first love for him has been tempered by experience . . . He must learn to accept that and let me love him in a new way, my own way . . . he must have patience . . . This is a new cycle in my life . . . he must wait for passion to possess me again . . . Until then, he must be satisfied with knowing I loved him once . . . He must learn more about

FUGUE, 2

me . . . By knowing me better, he will eventually come to respect the truth that is in me, and his love for me will grow deeper . . .

Man: There must be a foreknowledge of finality with love . . . A sense that it exists absolutely and finally . . . a trust in its uniqueness . . . and a profound certainty that without it one would perish . . . More than anything I want to give myself up to her . . . I want to commit myself body and soul to my love for her . . . I want to love her purely, simply, absolutely . . .

Woman: But without permanence . . .

Man: Nothing in life is permanent . . .

Woman: Not even truth is permanent . . .

Man: Sheís a cynic . . . incurable . . .

Woman: Inevitable . . . Heís such a muddle-headed romantic . . . and he sees me through a rose-colored glass . . .

Man: Sheís reading again . . . Night after night . . . living beside me but not with me . . . with me but not of me . . . alone and apart from me . . . I want to shock her out of this self-absorption . . . crush her in an embrace . . . murder her with passion . . . I want to kill the truth in her, the truth that she can live without me . . . And that is the reason I hate her

Woman: I love his hatred . . . It is the proof of his love . . . It makes his love more believable somehow, makes it real and true . . . I could not trust his love for me unless I believed that he hated me too, because I know I am worthy of his hatred . . . But can he ever know the part of me that is totally unconnected to him? . . . Can he love me in that place he is forbidden to enter?

Man: Iíve tried to understand her . . . her impetuous moods . . . her frenetic energy . . . her self-annihilation and denial . . . her need for truth and her negation of me . . . but there is a part of her that is mysterious and unreachable . . . I am bewildered by the part of her that has no connection with me . . . Sometimes we speak a different language . . . and sometimes we are silent . . . Yet I know that deep down we are the same . . . we have the same needs, the same vulnerabilities . . . How can I ever grasp the totality of this woman if she keeps a huge part of herself locked away from me? . . . How can I give her what she wants if she wonít let me understand her needs? . . . How much longer can I go on begging for intimacy without losing my self-respect? . . . I wish she would understand this

Woman: I have no desire to understand him anyone . . . Iíve given up trying to get inside his head . . . I have lost all my passion for him . . . Maybe I just know him too well, and

 
 
 

 

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Last modified: June 04, 2015